baking

It was an extremely relaxing weekend at the beach, with long walks in the rainy drizzle, barbecue brunches of haloumi and asparagus, and board games and golf and platters. My plans for a romantic Saturday night fish’n’chip picnic on said beach were thwarted by some aggressive spring wind, but a venue change to the couch (still with bubbles in paper cups) proved more than sufficient in comparison. Fresh battered snapper with chips doused in malt vinegar and Louis Roederer is quite the food and wine match, I can tell you.

The rainy Labour Day Monday morning was spent with coffee and friends and Settlers of Catan, and coming in hot taunting us on the family group chat were Mum’s utterly perfect cheese scones. My sister had requested the recipe a few weeks ago, which I dutifully sent her, and so then too we were taunted with photos of her fresh batch. The recipe is from Wellington’s Ministry of Food - they are, quite simply, the best cheese scones ever. I realised I’d had them on my old blog but it’s quite the travesty they aren’t yet here. So herewith, perfect for long weekends, taunting family members, or otherwise. Just don’t forget to slather them in butter.

Recipe inside!

Best Cheese Scones

Recipe from Wellington's Ministry of Food, as seen here on the Cuisine website.

Makes 8 cheese scones. Can easily be halved if you're on your own and having a craving. 

Seriously, best scones I've ever made. 

2 cups flour (plain flour is fine, but they work well with spelt flour) 
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
Generous pinch of smoked paprika (original recipe says use cayenne)
2 cups grated tasty cheese (a little parmesan on top works well)
1 cup full-cream milk

Sift the flour, baking powder, sugar, salt and cayenne pepper into a bowl.

Mix in the grated cheese.

Make a well in the centre and pour in the milk.

Mix lightly then turn out on a floured bench.

Shape into a rectangle about 3cm high. Cut into 8 and transfer on to a baking tray.

Bake at 220°C for 15-20 minutes until deep golden.

Serve slathered in butter with a cup of tea!

// Posted by Delaney at 1:15 PM // Labels: scones, cheese, baking

It's that most glorious time of the year where the nights are cool and the mornings are crisp and feijoa trees are dropping fruit daily, leaving a magical rotting carpet in backyards and driveways across the city. Even though Winter is looming, and the emotions associated with saying goodbye to the luscious stone-fruits of summer are akin to those associated with the abrupt end to a crush because they go and do something stupid like fall in love, there is hope in autumn. It is a promising time, filled with gym sessions and slow cooking and blog-rejuvination and baking. Autumn produce is so good: feijoas feature heavily, as do figs and pears and brussels sprouts.

The fragrant and tangy feijoa lends itself to baking extremely well, but they're also great scooped onto your morning porridge, and they're amazing thrown into a milkshake or smoothie. If you're getting stuck in with just a spoon and eating them raw, just be careful not to overdo it and shit yourself, ok?

Here's a few of my favourite ways with feijoas. Autumn! New beginnings, new crushes, and a shit-ton of feijoas. Tis the season!

Feijoa coconut gems

Recipe inside!

Apple and Feijoa Crumble

This recipe is adapted from the very excellent Pipi The Cookbook by Alexandra Tylee 

  • About 1.5kg cooking apples, peeled, cored and cut into slices, and about 500g feijoa flesh
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups flour
  • 1 3/4 cup whole rolled oats
  • 3/4 cup soft brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 250g butter, melted

Put the apples in a saucepan with a quarter of a cup of cold water. Sprinkle over the sugar and cook until soft. Add the feijoas for the last five minutes.  

In a bowl, mix together the flour, rolled oats, brown sugar, and baking powder. Pour in the melted butter, the luscious, luscious melted butter. Mix to combine. 

Drain the fruit and lay into a baking dish. Spoon the crumble over the top, being careful not to push it down flat.

Bake at 190C for one hour, until the crumble is completely cooked and golden brown (keep an eye on it as it may not need the full hour). Serve with runny cream or ice cream.

// Posted by Delaney at 1:03 PM // Labels: feijoas, baking, autumn

I’ve told this story a thousand times, but there’s cake at the end so bear with me. When I was 25 I started a food blog called Heartbreak Pie. I had seen a few food blogs overseas and thought “I could do that” plus I was freshly single, so I started writing about cooking and eating to make myself feel better. I didn’t think anyone, except for maybe a few food blogging American ladies, would read it. It was a cathartic, creative outlet which gave me something to do at night in my then shitty and cold and damp Mt Vic flat. They were the days before instagram, before excessive oversharing on the internet was commonplace, and at the time it felt very new and fun and exciting.

I am now 32 and thinking about some of the stuff I wrote and put on the internet makes me criiiiiinge, a bit like reading a teenage diary except that heaps of people have read it. Yeesh. Anyway! So last year I had a bit of a rebrand (/blog identity crisis) and decided my internet food writing could just happen under my name, and so I quietly removed Heartbreak Pie from the public eye (RIP/good riddance), had a bit of a party, launched delaneymes.com, and so here we are.

Recipe inside!

Plum and yoghurt cake

Ingredients

125g butter

200g white sugar

2 eggs

150g plain flour (I often use spelt flour, which is lovely and light)

1½ tsp baking powder

50g ground almonds

220g natural or greek yoghurt

1 x 850g tin black doris plums 

 

Preheat oven to 190C and line a 22cm cake tin with baking paper and butter. Drain the tin of plums into a sieve (handy hint! I mixed the plum liquid with some water and froze it into ice cubes/spheres to fancy-up my drinks).

Cream together the butter and sugar very well, until pale and fluffy. Thistakes ages. When you think it's done, give it another couple of minutes. You want genuinely pale and soft. It will be worth it!

Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition.

Sift the flour and baking powder over the butter mixture. Gently fold together until incorporated (I use my cake mixer on very low speed here).

Add the yoghurt and ground almonds, and mix to combine (again I use my cake mixer, but a spoon works fine!)

Scrape the cake mixture into the prepared tin. Remove the stones from the plums and gently press plum halves (they break in half easily) into the top of the cake. 

Bake for 50 minutes until golden. Turn the oven off, but leave the cake in the oven until cool (overnight is fine). This will help set the cake, although it's totally fine removed after 50 minutes and left to cool on a rack as normal. 

When ready to serve, dust the cake with a little icing sugar, and serve with yoghurt. It's also good gently warmed with softly whipped cream, and it's also really good with a thin layer of cream cheese icing made with just vanilla extract, lime or lemon juice, and a teency bit of icing sugar. Enjoy!  

// Posted by Delaney at 9:50 PM // Labels: cake, heartbreak pie, plums, baking